Hugel-what?

Hugel-what?

Hügelkultur is a German word that means hill or mound. In agriculture and gardening, it means no-dig raised beds constructed from decaying wood debris and other compostable biomass plant materials. They hold moisture, build fertility, maximize surface volume and are great spaces for growing fruit, vegetables and herbs.

 

Photo credit: www.richsoil.com

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Fall Task List for All Types of Properties

Fall Task List for All Types of Properties

The shorter days of autumn inspire us to slow down after a busy summer, but accomplishing a few tasks before the rains set in and the winds start to blow will make winter more pleasant and surprise you with a healthy land and soil-scape next spring.

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Local Businesses Beautify and Restore Stormwater Ponds

Local Businesses Beautify and Restore Stormwater Ponds

The Snohomish Conservation District gathered dozens of local volunteers last Thursday behind the Stanwood Camano Village to help restore a bare and degraded landscape right in their own backyard. Volunteers included employees from local businesses, including the YMCA, the Everett Clinic, Port Susan Dental Care, Subway, and Process Solutions.

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You Can Learn a Lot on Your Commute Home

You Can Learn a Lot on Your Commute Home

If you live in Monroe, and commute to I-5 and places beyond, you may see an Arco station along your route on the north side of Highway 2. Next to that Arco station are 8 acres of wetlands that the Snohomish Conservation District is helping to restore through a Department of Ecology grant. It is a unique opportunity to be so close to a major roadway making it highly visible. The hope is that this project site will promote public education, a sense of stewardship and a personal connection to the watershed.

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Questions Answered at Public Meeting for Culvert Replacement Project

Camano Island residents gathered on June 22nd to learn about Snohomish Conservation District's work with Island County to replace the Kristoferson Creek culverts at Barnum and Russell Roads. The new crossings are designed to allow passage at all times of the year between Triangle Cove and Kristoferson Creek for the different salmonid species, including endangered Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Island County, Snohomish Conservation District, and local residents and salmon recovery citizen volunteers have known about and tried to replace these two fish passage barriers for over 14 years, but funding, differing approaches, and salmon recovery priorities never aligned before now. In the meantime, however, the Kristoferson family and others have worked to improve the habitat conditions and water quality of Kristoferson Creek.

Construction may begin late this summer if permits are approved and suitable construction bids are received. If not, construction will occur in the summer of 2018. One culvert will be constructed at a time to provide for continual, easy access in and out of the neighborhood, and construction activities are expected to last between four and six weeks. No changes in road design are planned. Once completed, endangered juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead will be able to fully access lower Kristoferson Creek for rearing. Coho and chum salmon will have improved passage to about 1.6 miles of Kristoferson Creek for spawning and rearing. 

Questions? Please contact Kristin Marshall, Snohomish Conservation District project manager, at 425-377-7017 or kristin@snohomishcd.org. Comments may also be submitted online at snocd.org/kristoferson_comments. Interested parties may receive emailed construction updates by signing up at snocd.org/kristoferson-creek."

Now hiring for our Veteran Conservation Corps Crew Internship

Now hiring for our Veteran Conservation Corps Crew Internship

The Snohomish Conservation District and the Veterans Conservation Corps are excited to announce several internship opportunities for United States military veterans. This position will work with landowners on stormwater resource concerns within urban and residential areas of Snohomish County and Camano Island, and occasionally in other parts of the Puget Sound region. 

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Is Your Home Firewise?

Is Your Home Firewise?

As Westsiders here in Washington, it’s difficult to imagine the threat of a wildfire as we tromp through the rain and mud for close to eight months of the year. But due to our beautiful dry summers, the landscape can dry out quickly, presenting a window of time where a grass or forest fire can pose a serious threat to property and lives.

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Native Plants are Superheroes!

Native Plants are Superheroes!

It's Native Plant Appreciation Week and we're excited! Did you know that Washington enjoys an amazing biodiversity with over 3,000 native plant species from rain forest plants on the Olympic peninsula to the desert species in eastern Washington and that preserving native plant ecosystems is critical for protecting wildlife, birds, fish, and water quality in our state?  We wanted to find a way to celebrate a these mighty plant superheroes, so we've gathered a list of species native to Washington and match them with the superhero they are most like. 

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