Streambank Erosion

Streambank Erosion

If you have spent years living near a stream or river, you know that the channel doesn’t stay put. Rivers and streams are dynamic – “healthy” streams are a constantly changing system. Streams are rarely naturally straight; rather, they wind their way through the landscape, meandering back and forth. Bank erosion, where the soil along a stream or river is washed away, is a natural process and is important for creating and maintaining habitat for salmon and other fish and wildlife.

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Wetland Planting List

Wetland Planting List

Do you have a wet area in your yard?  These areas are called wetlands and provide places for many different kinds of wildlife to find food, water, nesting areas, and places to hide. Wetlands also soak in stormwater to filter and release it slowly, reducing flooding and pollution that makes it into the Puget Sound.

Salmonberry / Photo credit: Cindy Martin

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Your neighborhood beaver: Friend or Foe?

Your neighborhood beaver: Friend or Foe?

The mention of beavers usually elicits strong reactions from landowners. Some live next to a lake created by a beaver dam and want to make sure beavers maintain their dam and keep the lake’s water level consistent.   Others are concerned about downed trees and flooded yards or fields. The truth is that beavers provide many benefits to our landscape, but at times, they can also create situations we’re not willing to live with.
 

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